Weighing Matters

my journey to b.e.t.t.e.r

been there, dumb that!

I found this chart. I googled it and came up with about 47 charts.

Obesity is defined as 20% above normal weight.

I remember, very clearly, when I weighed 176 and was indeed obese!

Height

Obesity Point

Ft/inches Meters

Pounds

Kilos

4.10
4.11
5.0
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
5.8
5.9
5.10
5.11
6.0
1.47m
1.50m
1.52m
1.55m
1.57m
1.60m
1.63m
1.65m
1.68m
1.70m
1.73m
1.75m
1.78m
1.80m
1.83m
143 pounds
148 pounds
153 pounds
159 pounds
164 pounds
169 pounds
175 pounds
180 pounds
186 pounds
191 pounds
197 pounds
203 pounds
209 pounds
215 pounds
221 pounds
65.0kg
67.3kg
69.5kg
72.3kg
74.5kg
76.8kg
79.5kg
81.8kg
84.5kg
86.8kg
89.5kg
92.3kg
95.0kg
97.7kg
100.4kg

Do obese people know they’re obese? Not really, a new study suggests obese people judge their weight pretty well, but they tend to not realize, or blind themselves to obesity. This misperception seems to be linked to a misjudgment of which weights constitute obesity. Kimberly Trousdale researched how 104 adults viewed themselves. She asked male and female, white and black—to report their weight in pounds and to categorize themselves as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese. Participants were also asked to estimate how much they would need to weigh to be considered obese. The researchers classified each participant as ‘normal weight,’ ‘overweight’ or ‘obese’ based on their Body Mass Index, a standard, widely used measure that takes into account weight and height.

The group comprised 31 normal weight, 40 overweight, and 33 obese people. About 90 percent of normal-weight people, and 85 percent of overweight and obese ones, were found to report their weight and height accurately enough so that, if they had looked at widely available Body Mass Index charts, they could have correctly found which category they fit into. Asked for their best guess as to which category they in fact did belong to, 71 percent of normal weight and 73 percent of overweight adults were found to classify themselves correctly.

Only 15 percent of obese adults did.

The researchers also asked participants how much they would have to weigh to be considered underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese. On average, they found that normal-weight people were reasonably accurate in these estimates, but the obese overstated how much they could weigh for each category.

For example, a normal-weight participant of height 5’7” would typically define obesity as 189 lbs. An obese participant of the same height would judge 233 lbs. The actual dividing line is 191 lbs. for that height.

I don’t know how many times I have heard an obese person call themselves ‘heavy’ or ‘overweight.’ I’ve done it myself on occasion. They are softer words than ‘obese,’ which has a obviously negative ring to it. [In my own case, excruciating honesty about my own weight situation was painful, but necessary, to get from where I was to where I am.]

The findings have important public health implications. If obese adults don’t think themselves obese, they’re unlikely to fully tune in to public health messages on the many health risks associated with obesity, which can include heart disease, diabetes and some forms of cancer. Hello! Even premature death.

Future research would have to examine why people don’t recognize their own obesity—whether the reason is denial, difficulties with perception or something else.

Been there. Dumb that!

When I was obese, I certainly didn’t recognize it, admit it, or perceive that it was what it was. Believe me. I know where I’m coming from!

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October 11, 2009 - Posted by | Weight just a minute

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